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Friday, May 28, 2010

Comments

That is a beautiful scene--though in the deaf community the cochlear implant can be a very controversial topic.

Yep. Know why? Seeing "deaf" as "defective, something that needs to be fixed" when many deaf people are perfectly fine with being deaf. It's no big deal to them yet the medical profession insists on saying otherwise and not giving them much choice. Such as this baby. Major optional surgery(yes it is optional) on such a young child?

Something not well known: not all cochlear implants work out- some children still are unable to speak or 'hear' well but by the time this is discovered, the child has lost several years of vital language exposure(many implanted kids are raised in environments that strongly discourage any signing). Those "failures" often are placed in deaf schools or in classes with signing deaf kids.. essentially hidden out of view apart from the "successful cases". Another part of many reasons it's so-called "controversial amongst the deaf". They experience and see the results of programs like these directly. It ain't all hyped up to the hype, really.

A baby smiling at new stimuli just too powerful to resist. How adorable is that. He can hear! Triumph! But pretty much only the deaf people are the ones who will see this kid in several years, if it doesn't turn out as promised. Oh well.

Major optional surgery(yes it is optional) on such a young child?

The chances for success are much greater with a very young child because brain plasticisity is greatest in the very young.

many deaf people are perfectly fine with being deaf

Well "many deaf people" are not entitled to choose the fate of other people's children, no matter how self-righteous and condescending they are about it.

essentially hidden out of view apart from the "successful cases".

Oh please, the usual conspiracy nonsense. They aren't hidden out of view, but many deaf people live lives out of view. Most of the cases done this early are very successful.

Another part of many reasons it's so-called "controversial amongst the deaf". They experience and see the results of programs like these directly. It ain't all hyped up to the hype, really.

Mostly, this is a political issue. Some deaf people didn't want my child to hear because they equate cure with prejudice toward the deaf. That is the truth behind your little diatribe. Many deaf people rejected the idea of cochlear implants immediately because they didn't like the fact that they do work for so many who get the implants very early. My child can hear and speak now. If you had your way he'd be deaf now.

A baby smiling at new stimuli just too powerful to resist. How adorable is that. He can hear! Triumph!

You condescending ass. My son and many children can hear now because of the implants. Yes, Triumph!

only the deaf people are the ones who will see this kid in several years, if it doesn't turn out as promised. Oh well.

In several years, this baby will be living a normal life because this was done early. A normal life, like my child. You people are full of shit. You want to keep children deaf for the sake of deaf community politics. Shame on you! My child would be deaf if you had your way.

Marnie,

Wonderful that this worked out for your son. I believe this is ultimately a decision that parents are entitled to make for their own children, though I'm not so sure about success rates. Not taking anything away from the happy outcome for your son.

This is why I said, it is often a controversial topic. Having a daughter who is profoundly deaf in one ear, as I am, and knowing some people in the deaf community, I have heard many sides of this controversy, from many people, thus knowing how wildly controversial it is.

There is an entire 'culture' if you will, in deaf communities and some people absolute object to cochlear implants. I found it interesting, to listen in.

I could listen in in 2 ways. I have mastered reading lips, and know some ASL, but have no comment on the cochlear implant, because I have not been in that situation as a parent.

But, I have been with my daughter in hospitals and constantly having to remind staff she cannot hear in one ear, may sleep through fire alarms, etc.

Personally, I have 'jingle' bells on my doors and cupboards, and things to alert me of movement in and outside of my home.

It is a different world, but I also learned to rely on other senses, I guess. I couldn't have a conversation in a noisy setting if it wasn't for reading lips, that's for sure!

hmm....violate some sort of "deaf culture" taboo, or be able to hear fire alarms and save my life? hmm...you're right. it's much better to die in a fire so that i can preserve the "way i was born." geez...

everyone wants to "belong" to some sort of group and feel special. that is ridiculous. for those who cannot be given the gift of hearing again, thank goodness for the ASL language and tools to help them live viable, successful lives in a world that relies so heavily on speech and hearing. but for those who have a chance to not be deaf....seriously? it's even a question? what a bunch of whiny nonsense. yes, let's let the poor kid struggle through life just so he can be "different" with his special deaf brothers and sisters. inferiority complex to the max. any deaf parent who would prefer their child to be deaf is obviously more concerned about the "deaf culture" than increasing her own child's opportunities in life.

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